Our top 6 ideas in August

Nehru Snake Boat race, Kerala

The Nehru Trophy Boat race is held every August on Alleppey's Punnamda Lake in Kerala. The Snake boat race is the most popular of all the events and derives its name from the shape of the boats.  Snake boats are actually long traditional canoe style boats used by the people of the Kuttanadu region. Typical snake boats are 100 to 120 feet long, and hold around 100 rowers. Each of the villages in the region has its own snake boat and every year the villagers will vigorously compete in races along the lakes and rivers

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D3Ecuador

Horseriding, Ecuador

Explore Ecuador's most beautiful and biologically diverse areas on horseback. Ride through grassy plains in the Andes, or through lowland tropical rainforest. August is the perfect time to visit, with balmy temperatures up to 24°C

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Pantanal

Pantanal, Brazil

Brazil’s Pantanal is at its wildlife-rich best from July to September, offering the best chances of spotting jaguar. The Pantanal covers some 140,000 sq km and is the world’s largest freshwater wetland. Arguably the best place to view Brazil’s abundant wildlife, it contains over 700 species of birds and some 100 mammal species, including the majestic jaguar.

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Argentina Tango Dancers

Tango Competition, Argentina

August sees the tango world championships taking place in their spiritual home - Buenos Aires. 400 couples from around the world compete for this illustriuos title in a dance which owes its origins to the early 20th century working classes. 

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Maherero Day - Namibia

On the last weekend of every August the Herero people of Namibia line the streets and parade in front of their chiefs to celebrate Maherero Day, a festival commemorating an historic war between themselves and the Nama people. The Herero nation moved south into Namibia, it is thought, during the 16th century. According to their oral history they came from an area of much water and grass and many reeds, probably west of Lake Tanganyika, and entered Namibia between the Kunene and Okavango Rivers.  During the last ten to fifteen years of the 19th century, the Herero settled down in the areas around Okahandja, Waterberg/Okakarara and eastward, toward Omaruru and Otjimbingwe. Conflict between the Herero and the Nama caused major problems for both groups and both sides suffered casualties and cattle thieving. In 1904, the entire Herero population was almost decimated in one of Namibia’s worst colonial wars. But with great resiliency, the Herero persevered and today rank among Namibia’s best cattle farmers and businessmen. Herero are a very proud people and the observance of their cultural traditions is very important to them. They traditionally practiced ancestral worship, the ancestral fire through which they communicate with their ancestors is still kept burning in a number of remote villages.

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Bay of Islands

Cruising with Dolphins, New Zealand

The Bay of Islands is one of New Zealand’s most historically significant areas. With 144 mostly deserted islands, Northland has spectacular golden beaches, abundant climates, clear waters and fascinating wildlife.

The Bottlenose dolphins can be seen frolicking in their natural waters, and swimming through the seas. Join these gentle and fascinating animals in the warm waters to experience something magical. Further explore the island and spot the penguins, seals and whales harbouring near by. 

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